Dissecting systemic racism: policies, practices and epistemologies creating racialized systems of care for Indigenous peoples

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Abstract

In this paper we explore some of the ways systemic racism operates and is maintained within our health and social services. We look at a very specific context, that of Nunavik Quebec, land and home to 13,000 Nunavimmiut, citizens of Quebec and Canada, signatories of the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement. We operationalize some of the ways in which policies and practices create and support social hierarchies of knowledges, also called epistemic racism, and how it impacts our ability to offer quality care that Indigenous peoples can trust and use.

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Fraser, S. L., Gaulin, D., & Fraser, W. D. (2021, December 1). Dissecting systemic racism: policies, practices and epistemologies creating racialized systems of care for Indigenous peoples. International Journal for Equity in Health. BioMed Central Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12939-021-01500-8

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