Utilization of Formal Support Services for Elder Abuse: Do Informal Supporters Make a Difference?

5Citations
Citations of this article
25Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Few elder abuse (EA) victims ever seek or receive assistance from formal support services designed to mitigate risk and harm of revictimization. This study examined whether the presence of third-party "concerned persons" in victims' personal social networks plays a role in enabling formal support service utilization. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A representative population-based survey administered to adults (n = 800) in New York State identified 83 EA cases from the past year. Penalized likelihood logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between availability of a concerned person and victim formal support services usage. RESULTS: EA victims who had a concerned person in their personal life were significantly more likely to use formal EA support services than victims without a concerned person. EA victims who lived with their perpetrator were significantly less likely to use formal services. DISCUSSION AND IMPLICATIONS: Third-party concerned persons represent a critical population to target in efforts designed to promote EA victim help-seeking.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Burnes, D., Breckman, R., Henderson, C. R., Lachs, M. S., & Pillemer, K. (2019). Utilization of Formal Support Services for Elder Abuse: Do Informal Supporters Make a Difference? The Gerontologist, 59(4), 619–624. https://doi.org/10.1093/geront/gny074

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free