Nonlinear Creep Deformation of Polycarbonate at High Stress Level: Experimental Investigation and Finite Element Modeling

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Abstract

It is well known that polycarbonate (PC) undergoes time-dependent deformation (i.e., creep deformation), and nonlinear creep deformation is often experienced at high stress level. Using the time–temperature–stress superposition principle (TTSSP), we obtain a new master curve, which covers higher stress level, and successfully establish a new modeling method of creep deformation of PC. First, to investigate the effect of applied stress level on the creep compliance (i.e., stress-dependent nonlinear creep deformation), this study conducted various creep tests with eight different stress levels. We found that the creep compliance curve strongly depended on the applied stress level; in particular, a higher stress level induced a larger difference in creep compliance. According to the TTSSP, the creep compliance curve at each stress level shifts with the creep time (i.e., stress reduced time). When we appropriately selected the stress reduced time, we obtained the master curve of creep compliance, which is unified with respect to various applied stresses. However, we found that the stress-shifted factor is not compliant with the previous TTSSP, especially in the higher stress regime. Therefore, this regime was also considered to obtain a new master curve that can cover a wide range of stress levels. Finally, our established creep model (master curve and stress shift factor) was introduced into FEM, and then this numerical model was verified by comparison with experimental data. Our model may be useful for predicting the creep deformation of PC subjected to a wide range of applied stresses.

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Ikeshima, D., Matsuzaki, A., Nagakura, T., Emori, K., & Yonezu, A. (2019). Nonlinear Creep Deformation of Polycarbonate at High Stress Level: Experimental Investigation and Finite Element Modeling. Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance, 28(3), 1612–1617. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11665-019-03945-z

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