Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization rate among ruminant animals slaughtered for human consumption and contact persons in Maiduguri, Nigeria

  • Mai-siyama I
  • Okon K
  • Adamu N
  • et al.
N/ACitations
Citations of this article
12Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

This study determined the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization rate among ruminant animals slaughtered for human consumption and contact persons. Nasal and milk product samples were collected from the main abbatoir in Maiduguri and analyzed using standard bacteriological procedures. A total of 510 samples were analyzed, 87 (17.1%) S. aureus isolates were identified, 33 (34.6%) MRSA and 54 (65.9%) methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) isolates were detected. 19 (21.8%) MRSA and 17 (19.5) MSSA strains were recovered from cattle, 10 (12.5%) MRSA isolates were recovered from the Red Bororo cattle breed and 12 (17.1) MSSA from carmelius dromedarius. In overall antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, MRSA isolates exhibited multidrug resistance pattern, moderate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (42.2%), tobramycin (36.4%), amikacin (36.4%), streptomycin (42.2%), while majority of MSSA isolates demonstrated high sensitivity pattern (>70%). Six (6.9%) S. aureus isolates (2 MRSA from cattle and 4 MSSA from sheep) exhibited inducible phenotype. In conclusion, the study findings reveal a relatively high MRSA colonization rate and unique resistance pattern, particularly to topical antimicrobial agents (fusidic acid, mupirocin) that are not routinely used in veterinary medical practice in the study area. The study findings provides a baseline epidemiological information for better understanding of MRSA infections in human and veterinary medicine including foods of animal origin.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Mai-siyama, I. B., Okon, K. O., Adamu, N. B., Askira, U. M., Isyaka, T. M., Adamu, S. G., & Mohammed, A. (2014). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization rate among ruminant animals slaughtered for human consumption and contact persons in Maiduguri, Nigeria. African Journal of Microbiology Research, 8(27), 2643–2649. https://doi.org/10.5897/ajmr2014.6855

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free