Should we administrate anticoagulants to critically ill patients with new onset supraventricular arrhythmias?

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Abstract

Non-valvular new onset supraventricular arrhythmia (SVA; atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, atrial tachysystolia) is the most frequent rhythm disorder in surgical and non-surgical intensive care units (ICUs), occurring in 4.5% to 46% of critically ill patients [1-5]. Although SVA in critically ill patients is now recognized as an indicator of illness severity, its independent relationship with mortality is the subject of debate [1,4-6]. Regarding morbidity, recent data show that in-hospital arterial thromboembolic events (ATEs) are not rare [5]. A multicentre retrospective study, with approximately 50,000 patients hospitalized for severe sepsis, reported that SVA was associated with an increased adjusted risk of in-hospital ischaemic stroke (2.6% vs 0.6%; odds ratio 2.70 [2.05-3.57]; P < 0.001) [5].

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APA

Labbé, V., Ederhy, S., Fartoukh, M., & Cohen, A. (2015). Should we administrate anticoagulants to critically ill patients with new onset supraventricular arrhythmias? Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases, 108(4), 217–219. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acvd.2015.01.001

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