Spatial pattern of nonmuscle myosin-II distribution during the development of the Drosophila compound eye and implications for retinal morphogenesis

15Citations
Citations of this article
15Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Nonmuscle myosin-II is a motor protein that drives cell movement and changes in cell shape during tissue and organ development. This study has determined the dynamic changes in myosin-II distribution during Drosophila compound eye morphogenesis. In photoreceptor neurons, myosin-II is undetectable at the apical domain throughout the first half of pupal life, at which time this membrane domain is involuted into the epithelium and progresses toward the retinal floor. Myosin-II is deployed at the apical surface at about 60% of pupal development, once the developing rhabdomeres reach the retinal floor. Subsequently, myosin-II becomes restricted to two stripes at the sides of the developing rhabdomere, adopting its final position within the visual cells R1-6; here, myosin-II is associated with a set of actin filaments that extend alongside the rhabdomeres. At the midpupal stage, myosin-II is also incorporated into stress-fiber-like arrays within the basal endfeet of the pigment cells that then change their shape. This spatiotemporal pattern of myosin-II localization and the morphological defects observed in the eyes of a myosin-II mutant suggest that the myosin-II/F-actin system is involved in the alignment of the rhabdomeres within the retina and in the flattening of the retinal floor. The observation that the myosin-II/F-actin arrays are incomplete or disorganized in R7/R8 and in rhodopsin-1-null R1-6 suggests further that the establishment and stability of this cytoskeletal system depend on rhodopsin-1 expression. © 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Baumann, O. (2004). Spatial pattern of nonmuscle myosin-II distribution during the development of the Drosophila compound eye and implications for retinal morphogenesis. Developmental Biology, 269(2), 519–533. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ydbio.2004.01.047

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free