Usefulness of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide to predict mortality in adults with congenital heart disease

13Citations
Citations of this article
16Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Natriuretic peptides are often elevated in congenital heart disease (CHD); however, the clinical impact on mortality is unclear. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prognostic value of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in the prediction of all-cause mortality in adults with different CHD. In this prospective longitudinal mortality study, we evaluated NT-proBNP in 1,242 blood samples from 646 outpatient adults with stable CHD (mean age 35 ± 12 years; 345 women). Patients were followed up for 6 ± 3 (1 to 10) years. The mortality rate was 5% (35 patients, mean age 40 ± 14 years, 17 women). Median NT-proBNP (pg/ml) was 220 in the whole cohort, 203 in survivors, and 1,548 in deceased patients. The best discrimination value for mortality prediction was 630 pg/ml with 74% sensitivity and 84% specificity. During the follow-up, the survival rate was 65% for those with median NT-proBNP ≥630 pg/ml and 94% for NT-proBNP <630 pg/ml; p <0.0001. There was only 1% mortality among 388 patients with at least 1 NT-proBNP value ≤220 pg/ml compared with 41% mortality among 54 patients with at least 1 NT-proBNP value >1,548 pg/ml. Even the first (baseline) measurements of NT-proBNP were strongly associated with a high risk of death (log NT-proBNP had hazard ratio 7, p <0.0001). In conclusion, NT-proBNP assessment is a useful and simple tool for the prediction of mortality in long-term follow-up of adults with CHD.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Popelová, J. R., Kotaška, K., Tomková, M., & Tomek, J. (2015). Usefulness of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide to predict mortality in adults with congenital heart disease. American Journal of Cardiology, 116(9), 1425–1430. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2015.07.070

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free