Studies in an Early Development Window Unveils a Severe HSC Defect in both Murine and Human Fanconi Anemia

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Abstract

Fanconi anemia (FA) causes bone marrow failure early during childhood, and recent studies indicate that a hematopoietic defect could begin in utero. We performed a unique kinetics study of hematopoiesis in Fancg−/− mouse embryos, between the early embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) to E12.5 developmental window (when the highest level of hematopoietic stem cells [HSC] amplification takes place) and E14.5. This study reveals a deep HSC defect with exhaustion of proliferative and self-renewal capacities very early during development, together with severe FA clinical and biological manifestations, which are mitigated at E14.5 due to compensatory mechanisms that help to ensure survival of Fancg−/− embryos. It also reports that a deep HSC defect is also observed during human FA development, and that human FA fetal liver (FL) HSCs present a transcriptome profile similar to that of mouse E12.5 Fancg−/− FL HSCs. Altogether, our results highlight that early mouse FL could represent a good alternative model for studying Fanconi pathology. A deep HSC defect is present very early during Fancg−/− mouse embryonic development, and is also reported for the first time during human Fanconi anemia development. At E14.5, functional and molecular compensation in Fancg−/− FL HSCs help ensure the survival of Fancg−/− embryos. Altogether E12.5 Fancg−/− FL could represent a good model for studying Fanconi pathology.

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Domenech, C., Maillard, L., Rousseau, A., Guidez, F., Petit, L., Pla, M., … Souyri, M. (2018). Studies in an Early Development Window Unveils a Severe HSC Defect in both Murine and Human Fanconi Anemia. Stem Cell Reports, 11(5), 1075–1091. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.stemcr.2018.10.001

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