Cryotherapy Relieves Pain and Edema After Inguinal Hernioplasty in Males With End-Stage Renal Disease: A Prospective Randomized Study

2Citations
Citations of this article
17Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Context: Tension-free hernioplasty under local anesthetic infiltration is a reasonable choice for end-stage renal disease patients with hernia. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to investigate the feasibility of cryotherapy after hernioplasty surgery to relieve pain and scrotal edema. Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, and controlled trial held in a large integrated health care facility in South China. One hundred sixty-nine male patients on hemodialysis and scheduled for hernioplasty were enrolled between March 2013 and February 2017. The participants were divided into an intervention group and a control group. In the intervention group, ice packs were applied after surgery. Demographic information, vital signs, pain score, opioid consumption, wound inflammation, scrotal edema, and patient satisfaction were compared between the two groups. The primary outcome was pain score. Results: Cryotherapy-treated patients required less opioid consumption (5.95 vs. 15.29 mg; P < 0.05), reported lower pain scores from 30 minutes to 48 hours after operation (P < 0.05), less wound inflammation (11.90 vs. 32.94%; P < 0.05), lower incidence of scrotal edema in the first and second days (P < 0.05), and higher patient satisfaction (8.95 vs. 6.50 cm; P < 0.05), with stable vital signs throughout the monitoring period (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Owing to its favorable cost, convenience, and low frequency of adverse effects, cryotherapy is useful for end-stage renal disease populations after hernioplasty to relieve pain and scrotal edema.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Zhang, F. R., Zheng, Y., Yan, L. J., Ma, C. S., Chen, J. T., & Li, W. (2018). Cryotherapy Relieves Pain and Edema After Inguinal Hernioplasty in Males With End-Stage Renal Disease: A Prospective Randomized Study. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 56(4), 501–508. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2018.07.007

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free