The association of surface adhesin genes and the biofilm formation among Klebsiella oxytoca clinical isolates

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Abstract

Bacterial adhesins mediate the attachment and biofilm production leading to the persistence of colonized strains. The aim of this study was evaluation of the association of surface adhesin genes with the biofilm formation among Klebsiella oxytoca isolates. Among 50 isolates of K. oxytoca from patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, the susceptibility test, MIC (according to CLSI 2016) and phenotypic biofilm formation (with microtitre tissue-plate assay) were performed. The presence of adhesins was investigated using PCR. Thirty-three (66%) isolates produced moderate-level biofilms, but none of them exhibited strong biofilm formation. The presence of adhesins was as follows: fimA, 60% (n = 30), mrkA, 42% (n = 21), matB, 96% (n = 48) and pilQ, 92% (n = 46). The biofilm formation was related to the presence of fimA (odds ratio (OR) 0.8571, 95% CI 1.733–6.267, p <0.0001), mrkA (OR 0.2462, 95% CI 2.723–4.622, p 0.001), matB (OR 0.4521, 95% CI 1.353–5.332, p 0.008) and pilQ (OR 0.1481, 95% CI 1.691–6.117, p <0.0001). The npsB toxin-encoding gene was detected among 46 (92%) isolates. Resistance to non-β-lactam antibiotics was significantly associated with the presence of adhesin-encoding genes. The presence of adhesins and the capsular encoding gene was significantly associated with biofilm formation among K. oxytoca isolates. The presence of surface adhesin-encoding genes was significantly associated with the biofilm formation and also with resistance to non-β-lactam antibiotics among K. oxytoca clinical isolates. In addition, biofilm production was not significantly associated with β-lactam resistance among the isolates.

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APA

Ghasemian, A., Mobarez, A. M., Peerayeh, S. N., & Bezmin Abadi, A. T. (2019). The association of surface adhesin genes and the biofilm formation among Klebsiella oxytoca clinical isolates. New Microbes and New Infections, 27, 36–39. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nmni.2018.07.001

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