Genome sequencing, assembly, annotation and analysis of Staphylococcus xylosus strain DMB3-Bh1 reveals genes responsible for pathogenicity

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Abstract

Background: Staphylococcus xylosus is coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), found occasionally on the skin of humans but recurrently on other mammals. Recent reports suggest that this commensal bacterium may cause diseases in humans and other animals. In this study, we present the first report of whole genome sequencing of S. xylosus strain DMB3-Bh1, which was isolated from the stool of a mouse. Results: The draft genome of S. xylosus strain DMB3-Bh1 consisted of 2,81,0255 bp with G+C content of 32.7 mol%, 2623 predicted coding sequences (CDSs) and 58 RNAs. The final assembly contained 12 contigs of total size 2,81,0255 bp with N50 contig length of 4,37,962 bp and the largest contig assembled measured 7,61,338 bp. Further, an interspecies comparative genomic analysis through rapid annotation using subsystem technology server was achieved with Staphylococcus aureus RF122 that revealed 36 genes having similarity with S. xylosus DMB3-Bh1. 35 genes encoded for virulence, disease and defense and 1 gene encoded for phages, prophages and transposable elements. Conclusions: These results suggest co linearity in genes between S. xylosus DMB3-Bh1 and S. aureus RF122 that contribute to pathogenicity and might be the result of horizontal gene transfer. The study indicates that S. xylosus DMB3-Bh1 may be a potential emerging pathogen for rodents.

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Kaur, G., Arora, A., Sathyabama, S., Mubin, N., Verma, S., Mayilraj, S., & Agrewala, J. N. (2016). Genome sequencing, assembly, annotation and analysis of Staphylococcus xylosus strain DMB3-Bh1 reveals genes responsible for pathogenicity. Gut Pathogens, 8(1), 1–9. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13099-016-0139-8

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