The -351A/G polymorphism of ESR1 is associated with risk of myocardial infarction but not with extreme longevity

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Abstract

Background: Women live longer than men. Some possible reasons for this advantage are the protection provided by high concentrations of 17β-estradiol (E2) during the premenopausal period and polymorphic variants of the estrogen receptors (ERs), which mediate various cardiovascular functions of E2. Methods: We tested whether the -351A/G and -397T/C polymorphisms of the ERα-encoding ESR1 were associated with extreme longevity. The genomic DNA of 148 centenarians (C), 414 young controls (Y), and 208 myocardial infarction patients (MI) was analyzed by RFLP-PCR. Results: Both polymorphisms were equally distributed in the Y, C, and in centenarians never diagnosed with MI (HC). In centenarians, none of these polymorphisms was associated with a particular lipid profile. The AA genotype of the -351A/G polymorphism was less frequent in the C, HC and Y groups than in MI patients (p. = 0.058, p. = 0.021, and p. = 0.004, respectively). In MI patients, the GG genotype of the -351A/G polymorphism was associated with significantly lower mean total cholesterol, LDL, and HDL levels compared to the AG (p. = 0.0194, p. = 0.0213, and p. = 0.0367, respectively) and AA genotypes (p. = 0.0014, p. = 0.0078, and p. = 0.0448, respectively). Conclusions: The -351A/G ESR1 polymorphism might be associated with MI, but not with extreme longevity. © 2010.

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Roszkowska-Gancarz, M., Kurylowicz, A., Polosak, J., Ambroziak, M., & Puzianowska-Kuznicka, M. (2010). The -351A/G polymorphism of ESR1 is associated with risk of myocardial infarction but not with extreme longevity. Clinica Chimica Acta, 411(23–24), 1883–1887. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cca.2010.06.028

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