Asymmetry of perceived motion smear during head and eye movements: Evidence for a dichotomous neural categorization of retinal image motion

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Abstract

We measured perceived motion smear when retinal image motion was created either by a physically moving object or by movement of the eyes or head. Consistent with previous reports, the extent of perceived motion smear during an eye or head movement is less than that produced by physical object motion when the eyes are stationary. Moreover, perceived smear is substantially smaller when the motion of the retinal image is in the same direction as the eye or head movement compared to when image motion is in the opposite direction. These results imply that extra-retinal signals associated with eye and head movements contribute to a reduction of perceived motion smear, thereby fostering perceptual clarity. We hypothesize that the visual system uses a simple dichotomous strategy in applying these extra-retinal signals, based only on the direction of retinal image motion with respect to the ongoing eye or head movement. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Tong, J., Patel, S. S., & Bedell, H. E. (2005). Asymmetry of perceived motion smear during head and eye movements: Evidence for a dichotomous neural categorization of retinal image motion. Vision Research, 45(12), 1519–1524. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2004.12.004

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