The Position of the Patella and Extensor Mechanism Affects Intraoperative Compartmental Loads During Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Pilot Study Using Intraoperative Sensing to Guide Soft Tissue Balance

22Citations
Citations of this article
25Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

The achievement of a well-balanced total knee arthroplasty is necessary for long-term success. We hypothesize that the dislocation of the patella during surgery affects the distribution of loads in the medial and lateral compartments. Intraoperative load sensors were used to record medial and lateral compartment loads in 56 well-balanced TKAs. Loads were recorded in full extension, relaxed extension, at 45 and 90° of flexion at full gravity-assisted flexion, with the patella in four different positions: dislocated (everted and not), located, and located and secured with two retinacular sutures. The loads in the lateral compartment in flexion were higher with a dislocated patella than with a located patella (P< 0.001). A lateralized extensor mechanism artificially increases in the lateral compartment loads in flexion during TKA surgery. Instruments that allow intraoperative soft tissue balance with the patella in a physiologic position are more likely to replicate postoperative compartment loads. Level of evidence: II (prospective comparative study).

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Schnaser, E., Lee, Y. yu, Boettner, F., & Gonzalez Della Valle, A. (2015). The Position of the Patella and Extensor Mechanism Affects Intraoperative Compartmental Loads During Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Pilot Study Using Intraoperative Sensing to Guide Soft Tissue Balance. Journal of Arthroplasty, 30(8), 1348-1353.e3. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arth.2015.03.004

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free