Imagine dying from an overseas disease, when you do not even own a passport: A critical analysis of Twitter conversations in the wake of COVID-19 in Kenya and South Africa

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Abstract

South Africa has had a long history of institutionalized racial segregation and although it came to an end in the early 1990s, the level of power, racial and inequalities are still evident to date, making South Africa one of the most unequal societies in the world. Kenya, on the other hand, has had its share of inequali-ties, particularly inclined towards political and ethnic dimensions. The emergence of COVID-19 has further uncovered social and political fractures within the two societies with racialized and discriminatory responses to fear disproportionately affecting marginalized groups. Using qualitative research design, and case study approach, a corpus of tweets from social media archive (Twitter) when the first COVID-19 cases were recorded in both countries were analysed to ascertain the conversations occurring and if it re-enforces existing postcolonial issues. The study argued that Twitter conversations that occurred in both countries show that postcolonial issues of power and race are rife and appeared in many public conversations on social media.

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APA

Mwaura, J., & Akpojivi, U. (2022). Imagine dying from an overseas disease, when you do not even own a passport: A critical analysis of Twitter conversations in the wake of COVID-19 in Kenya and South Africa. Journal of African Media Studies, 14(1), 29–44. https://doi.org/10.1386/jams_00063_1

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