The Association Between Vascular Risk Factors and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Both Sexes

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Abstract

Objectives: To test the potential role of atherosclerosis in the development of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), we investigated the association between vascular risk factors and LUTS in both sexes. Methods: Men and women participating in a health screening project completed the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). In parallel all individuals underwent a detailed health investigation with assessment of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and nicotine use. Results: A total of 1724 men (52.3 ± 9.1yr, mean ± standard deviation; IPSS: 6.3 ± 4.3) and 812 women (56.0 ± 9.9 yr; IPSS: 5.2 ± 4.9) entered the study. A total of 62.5% (n = 1077) of men had no vascular risk factor, 32.1% (n = 554) one, and 5.4% (n = 93) two or more; the corresponding figures for women were 64.7% (n = 525), 30.7% (n = 249), and 4.7% (n = 38). In men, the IPSS was identical in those with no (6.2 ± 4.1) and one (6.2 ± 4.4) vascular risk factor yet increased to 7.7 ± 5.5 (+24.2%) in those with two or more risk factors (p = 0.01). In women, the IPSS increased from 4.8 ± 4.6 in those with no vascular risk factor to 5.7 ± 5.3 (+18.7%) with one and 7.0 ± 5.7 (+45.8%) with two or more factors (p = 0.05). Conclusions: Our data suggest that vascular risk factors play a role in the development of LUTS in both sexes. This observation opens new aspects in our understanding of the pathogenesis of LUTS and warrants future studies. © 2006 European Association of Urology.

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APA

Ponholzer, A., Temml, C., Wehrberger, C., Marszalek, M., & Madersbacher, S. (2006). The Association Between Vascular Risk Factors and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Both Sexes. European Urology, 50(3), 581–586. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eururo.2006.01.031

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