The prevalence of fatigue following deep brain stimulation surgery in Parkinson's disease and association with quality of life

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Abstract

Fatigue is a common and disabling nonmotor symptom seen in Parkinson's disease (PD). While deep brain stimulation surgery (DBS) improves motor symptoms, it has also been associated with non-motor side effects. To date no study has utilized standardized instruments to evaluate fatigue following DBS surgery. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of fatigue following DBS surgery in PD its impact on quality of life and explore predictive factors. We recruited 44 PD subjects. At least one year following DBS placement, we administered the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39), the Beck Depression Inventory, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the UPDRS, and a neuropsychological battery. Fifty-eight percent of subjects had moderate to severe fatigue. Fatigue was significantly associated with quality of life, depression, and anxiety. Depression preoperatively was the only predictive factor of fatigue. Fatigue is common following DBS surgery and significantly impacts quality of life. © Copyright 2012 Benzi M. Kluger et al.

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APA

Kluger, B. M., Parra, V., Jacobson, C., Garvan, C. W., Rodriguez, R. L., Fernandez, H. H., … Okun, M. S. (2012). The prevalence of fatigue following deep brain stimulation surgery in Parkinson’s disease and association with quality of life. Parkinson’s Disease. https://doi.org/10.1155/2012/769506

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