Cognitive behavioral therapy for suicide prevention (CBT-SP): Implications for meeting standard of care expectations with suicidal patients

12Citations
Citations of this article
68Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

Accumulating evidence supports the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for suicide prevention (CBT-SP) as an empirically supported treatment approach for suicidal patients. In light of these findings, several procedures pulled from CBT-SP have been recommended for standard care with suicidal patients. The present article provides an overview of the procedures used in CBT-SP and discusses how these procedures meet, or even exceed, standard of care expectations for outpatient mental healthcare clinicians. Finally, the relevance of clinician fidelity to the CBT-SP model when evaluating standard of care expectations is discussed.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Bryan, C. J. (2019). Cognitive behavioral therapy for suicide prevention (CBT-SP): Implications for meeting standard of care expectations with suicidal patients. Behavioral Sciences and the Law, 37(3), 247–258. https://doi.org/10.1002/bsl.2411

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free