Effect of intramural, subserosal, and submucosal uterine fibroids on the outcome of assisted reproductive technology treatment

232Citations
Citations of this article
41Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the effect of subserosal, intramural, and submucosal fibroids on the outcome of assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment. Design: A retrospective comparative study. Setting: A tertiary referral center for infertility. Patient(s): Treatment outcome of 106 ART cycles in 88 patients with uterine fibroids (33 subserosal, 46 intramural without cavity distortion, and 9 submucosal) was compared with that of 318 ART cycles in age-matched patients without fibroids. Intervention(s): Controlled ovarian hyperstimulation and ART. Main Outcome Measure(s): Findings on transvaginal uterine ultrasonography performed before the initiation of treatment and pregnancy and implantation rates. Result(s): The pregnancy rates per transfer were 34.1%, 16.4%, 10%, and 30.1% in the patients with subserosal fibroids, intramural fibroids, submucosal fibroids and no fibroids, respectively. The implantation rates were 15.1%, 6.4%, 4.3%, and 15.7%, respectively. Both rates were significantly lower in patients with intramural fibroids than in those with subserosal fibroids or no fibroids. Conclusion(s): Pregnancy and implantation rates were significantly lower in the groups of patients with intramural and submucosal fibroids, even when there was no deformation of the uterine cavity. Pregnancy and implantation rates were not influenced by the presence of subserosal fibroids. Surgical or medical treatment should be considered in infertile patients who have intramural and/or submucosal fibroids before resorting to ART treatment.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Eldar-Geva, T., Meagher, S., Healy, D. L., MacLachlan, V., Breheny, S., & Wood, C. (1998). Effect of intramural, subserosal, and submucosal uterine fibroids on the outcome of assisted reproductive technology treatment. Fertility and Sterility, 70(4), 687–691. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0015-0282(98)00265-9

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free