Evidence that the anti-coagulant and lethal properties of a basic phospholipase A2 from snake venom are unrelated

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Abstract

The basic phospholipase A2 (PLA2) from venom of the African elapid Naja nigricollis was previously shown to have anti-coagulant and lethal properties, both of which were abolished by treatment with p-bromophenacyl bromide (pBP). In the present paper we first report that pBP-treated PLA2 is capable of inhibiting the anti-coagulant activity but not the lethal activity of native PLA2, thus suggesting that both properties might be independent. We then confirm this evidence using PLA2-specific monoclonal immunoglobulins. One of these, called HSF, neutralized the lethal activity but not the anti-coagulant activity, whereas another antibody, called HSP2, inhibited the anti-coagulant activity but not the lethal activity of the PLA2. The data presented in this paper are taken as evidence that the anti-coagulant activity is not implicated in the lethal effects of basic PLA2 from Naja nigricollis. © 1989.

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APA

Chwetzoff, S., Couderc, J., Frachon, P., & Menez, A. (1989). Evidence that the anti-coagulant and lethal properties of a basic phospholipase A2 from snake venom are unrelated. FEBS Letters, 248(1–2), 1–4. https://doi.org/10.1016/0014-5793(89)80419-3

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