Reduction of white coat effect by cilnidipine in essential hypertension

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Abstract

Stress elevates blood pressure (BP) by increased sympathetic nerve activity. Cilnidipine, a novel dihydropyridine calcium antagonist that has inhibitory actions on N-type as well as L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels, has been reported to attenuate the cold stress-induced increase in plasma norepinephrine and BP in rats. Because white coat effect is associated with an enhanced pressor response to mental stress, we postulated that cilnidipine would attenuate white coat effect in patients with essential hypertension. Sixty-one consecutive outpatients (50 men, 11 women) with essential hypertension were studied prospectively. Twenty-nine patients were treated with either cilnidipine (n = 15) or nifedipine, a representative L-type voltage-dependent calcium antagonist (n = 14). Gender, age, body mass index, duration of hypertension, target organ damage of hypertension, and BP and heart rate (HR) were not significantly different between cilnidipine and nifedipine groups, and both systolic (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) were significantly decreased after treatment in both groups. White coat effects on systolic and DBP and HR were not significantly different between groups before antihypertensive treatment. Cilnidipine, but not nifedipine, significantly reduced white coat effects on SBP and HR. Furthermore, white coat effects on systolic BP and HR were significantly lower after treatment in the cilnidipine group compared with the nifedipine group. These data suggest that cilnidipine may reduce white coat effect in hypertensive patients by N-type calcium channel antagonism. © 2001 American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd.

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APA

Morimoto, S., Takeda, K., Oguni, A., Kido, H., Harada, S., Moriguchi, J., … Nakagawa, M. (2001). Reduction of white coat effect by cilnidipine in essential hypertension. American Journal of Hypertension, 14(10), 1053–1057. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0895-7061(01)02159-8

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