Mind the Income Gaps? Experimental Evidence of Information’s Lasting Effect on Redistributive Preferences

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Abstract

Individuals reject economic inequality if they believe it to result from unequal opportunities. This paper argues income gaps between groups determined at birth, based on sex, race, or family background, can serve people as an indication of unequal opportunities. Findings from a survey experiment show Americans underestimate these gaps. When confronted with accurate information, participants correct their perceptions and adjust redistributive preferences. A follow-up survey finds these effects to last for over one year. In sum, this paper contributes to political economy scholarship that links individual preferences to objective characteristics of the income distribution. Focusing on income gaps offers new ways to explore the political consequences of structural economic change.

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APA

Becker, B. (2020). Mind the Income Gaps? Experimental Evidence of Information’s Lasting Effect on Redistributive Preferences. Social Justice Research, 33(2), 137–194. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11211-019-00343-7

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