Hygelac’s Raid in Historiography and Poetry: The King’s Necklace and Beowulf as ‘Epic’

2Citations
Citations of this article
2Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

This article studies historical narratives about Hygelac’s failed raid in Frisia as analogues for the representation of the king’s treasure in Beowulf. Though the poet alters the raid’s sequence of events, he preserves the chief circumstances and major themes present in accounts of the attack, which strongly suggests that he knew a narrative about it not unlike what we find in historiography, and focuses on the treasure to illustrate a past rife with quarreling, as conflict revolves around Hygelac’s necklace. Furthermore, the author of Beowulf elaborated on the mobility of this treasure to compose a poem, which, if it cannot be called epic, has epic pretensions.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Currie, E. (2020). Hygelac’s Raid in Historiography and Poetry: The King’s Necklace and Beowulf as ‘Epic.’ Neophilologus, 104(3), 391–400. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11061-019-09627-4

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free