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Self-tracking of Physical Activity in People with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of an online self-tracking program on physical activity, glycated hemoglobin, and other health measures in patients with type 2 diabetes. Seventy-two patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. All participants received usual care. The intervention group received an activity tracker (Fitbit Zip) connected to an online lifestyle program. Physical activity was analyzed in average steps per day from week 0 until 12. Health outcome measurements occurred in both groups at baseline and after 13 weeks. Results indicated that the intervention group significantly increased physical activity with 1.5 ± 3 days per week of engagement in 30 minutes of moderate-vigorous physical activity versus no increase in the control group (P =.047). Intervention participants increased activity with 1255 ± 1500 steps per day compared to their baseline (P

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APA

Kooiman, T. J. M., De Groot, M., Hoogenberg, K., Krijnen, W. P., Van Der Schans, C. P., & Kooy, A. (2018). Self-tracking of Physical Activity in People with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial. CIN - Computers Informatics Nursing, 36(7), 340–349. https://doi.org/10.1097/CIN.0000000000000443

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