A decreased risk of meningioma in women smokers was only observed in American studies rather than studies conducted in other countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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Abstract

Background: Whether smoking is related to a decreased risk of meningioma in women is still controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis examining the association between smoking and risk of meningiomas in women. Methods: Two authors independently performed a systematic literature review in the PubMed, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE databases. We identified case-control and cohort studies quantifying associations between smoking and risk of meningioma in women. A meta-analysis by pooling studies was performed according to the multivariate-adjusted risk estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) preferentially. We further conducted additional subgroup and sensitivity analyses to explore possible explanations of the results. Results: A total of seven observational studies were included, with a total of 2132 female patients diagnosed with meningiomas. Ever smoking was associated with a significantly reduced risk of meningioma in women, with pooled odds ratio (OR) of 0.83 (95% CI 0.70–0.98). Similar findings were noted for current (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.66–0.93) and past (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.71–0.94) smokers. However, considering the areas, the OR of ever smoking was 0.77 (95% CI 0.68–0.87) in three American studies, but 0.99 (95% CI 0.73–1.35) in four studies conducted in other countries. Conclusions: Based on limited epidemiological evidence, a decreased risk of meningioma in women smokers was only observed in American studies rather than studies conducted in other countries.

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Zhong, P., Lin, Y., & Chen, T. (2021). A decreased risk of meningioma in women smokers was only observed in American studies rather than studies conducted in other countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Chinese Neurosurgical Journal, 7(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s41016-021-00261-1

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