Expanding transnational care networks: comparing caring for families with caring for homes

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Abstract

Although many factors may motivate a migrant to own a house in their country of origin, significant practical labour is needed to maintain it, as both a material structure intended for shelter and as a symbolic object reflecting attachment to a place of origin. Most research in this area focuses on the significance accorded to transnational houses by their owners and families connoted by the ‘myth of return’, but little attention has been given to how the labour of ownership – constructing, maintaining, overseeing and improving the house – is accomplished. In the light of emerging studies on the care labour that remittance houses require, this article suggests a theoretical framework for studying networks of transnational house maintenance on three dimensions of care – trust, communication, and remittances – observed in networks for transnational family care provisions. A review of literature on transnational home ownership indicates that these dimensions are also present, with some differences in application.

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APA

Schaab, T., & Wagner, L. (2020, January 1). Expanding transnational care networks: comparing caring for families with caring for homes. Global Networks. Blackwell Publishing Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1111/glob.12257

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