The effect of tensile hysteresis and contact resistance on the performance of strain-resistant elastic-conductive webbing

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Abstract

To use e-textiles as a strain-resistance sensor they need to be both elastic and conductive. Three kinds of elastic-conductive webbings, including flat, tubular, and belt webbings, made of Lycra fiber and carbon coated polyamide fiber, were used in this study. The strain-resistance properties of the webbings were evaluated in stretch-recovery tests and measured within 30% strain. It was found that tensile hysteresis and contact resistance significantly influence the tensile elasticity and the resistance sensitivity of the webbings. The results showed that the webbing structure definitely contributes to the tensile hysteresis and contact resistance. The smaller the friction is among the yarns in the belt webbing, the smaller the tensile hysteresis loss. However the close proximity of the conductive yarns in flat and tubular webbings results in a lower contact resistance. © 2011 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

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APA

Shyr, T. W., Shie, J. W., & Jhuang, Y. E. (2011). The effect of tensile hysteresis and contact resistance on the performance of strain-resistant elastic-conductive webbing. Sensors, 11(2), 1693–1705. https://doi.org/10.3390/s110201693

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