Do No Harm in refugee humanitarian aid: the case of the Rohingya humanitarian response

  • Khaled A
N/ACitations
Citations of this article
17Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

This artice is free to access.

Abstract

The article broadly examines how humanitarian aid for Rohingya refugees inadvertently harmed poorer hosts and adversely affected local capacities for peace. The article also discusses possible ways of easing tension and improving social cohesion in the refugee-hosting areas, while also highlighting how policy- and mandate-related constraints hinder a humanitarian response anchored in the "Do No Harm" principle. Finally, the article concludes with the argument that the humanitarian agencies should not just limit themselves to identifying the unintended consequences and lapses in the intervention. Instead, the Do No Harm principle should lead humanitarian aid agencies to make an active effort to accept responsibility for the harm while taking all necessary steps to mitigate or avoid harming in future interventions.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Khaled, A. F. Md. (2021). Do No Harm in refugee humanitarian aid: the case of the Rohingya humanitarian response. Journal of International Humanitarian Action, 6(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s41018-021-00093-9

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free