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Higher Gestational Choline Levels in Maternal Infection Are Protective for Infant Brain Development

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Abstract

Objective: To assess whether maternal choline decreases effects of mothers' infections on fetal brain circuit development and on expression of infant behavior at 1 year of age. Study design: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a public hospital obstetrics and midwifery service, with prenatal assessments of maternal infection, C-reactive protein, and choline level and postnatal assessments of cerebral neuronal inhibition in 162 newborns. At 1 year, 136 parents completed reports of their child's behavior. Results: Maternal infection at 16 weeks of gestation, experienced by 41% of mothers, raised mean maternal C-reactive protein (d’ = 0.47, P =.002) and decreased the development of cerebral inhibition of auditory response at 1 month of age (d’ = 0.39, P

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Freedman, R., Hunter, S. K., Law, A. J., Wagner, B. D., D’Alessandro, A., Christians, U., … Hoffman, M. C. (2019). Higher Gestational Choline Levels in Maternal Infection Are Protective for Infant Brain Development. Journal of Pediatrics, 208, 198-206.e2. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.12.010

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