Educational transitions and educational inequality: A multiple pathways sequential logit model analysis of finnish birth cohorts 1960-1985

3Citations
Citations of this article
22Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

We developed a multiple pathways sequential logit model for analysing social background inequality in completed education and applied it to analyse educational inequality in Finland (birth cohorts 1960-1985). Our model builds on the sequential logit model for educational transitions, originally presented by Robert D. Mare and later extended by Maarten Buis, which disaggregates inequality in completed education into the weighted sum of inequalities in the transitions leading to it. Although the educational transitions framework is popular among educational stratification researchers, its applications have almost exclusively focused on analysing inequalities in separate educational transitions. Buis presented a unifying model of inequalities in educational transitions and completed education, which gives a substantive interpretation to the weights that link them. We applied this to an educational system in which the same educational outcomes can be reached through multiple pathways. Our analysis of Finnish register data shows that intergenerational educational persistence increased, particularly among women. The main reasons are increased inequality in academic upper-secondary (gymnasium) completion and gymnasium expansion that increased the weight of this transition as well as of the transition to university. We discuss the integration of structural and allocative mechanisms in educational stratification research.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Härkönen, J., & Sirniö, O. (2020). Educational transitions and educational inequality: A multiple pathways sequential logit model analysis of finnish birth cohorts 1960-1985. European Sociological Review, 36(5), 700–719. https://doi.org/10.1093/esr/jcaa019

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free