Comparing Automated Classification and Digitization Approaches to Detect Change in Eelgrass Bed Extent During Restoration of a Large River Delta

  • Davenport A
  • Davis J
  • Woo I
  • et al.
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Abstract

Abstract Native eelgrass (Zostera marina) is an important contributor to ecosystem services that supplies cover for juvenile fish, supports a variety of invertebrate prey resources for fish and waterbirds, provides substrate for herring roe consumed by numerous fish and birds, helps stabilize sediment, and sequesters organic carbon. Seagrasses are in decline globally, and monitoring changes in their growth and extent is increasingly valuable to determine impacts from large-scale estuarine restoration and inform blue carbon mapping initiatives. Thus, we examined the efficacy of two remote sensing mapping methods with high-resolution (0.5 m pixel size) color near infrared imagery with ground validation to assess change following major tidal marsh restoration. Automated classification of false color aerial imagery and digitized polygons documented a slight decline in eelgrass area directly after restoration followed by an increase two years later. Classification of sparse and low to medium density eelgrass w...

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Davenport, A. E., Davis, J. D., Woo, I., Grossman, E. E., Barham, J., Ellings, C. S., & Takekawa, J. Y. (2017). Comparing Automated Classification and Digitization Approaches to Detect Change in Eelgrass Bed Extent During Restoration of a Large River Delta. Northwest Science, 91(3), 272–282. https://doi.org/10.3955/046.091.0307

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