Culture, capital, and the political economy gender gap: Evidence from meghalaya’s matrilineal tribes

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Abstract

What explains the gender gap in political engagement and economic policy preferences? Many scholars point to material resources, while others credit cultural determinants. We identify and test an important link between these factors: cultural lineage norms that structure entitlements to resources. Studying the relationship between culture and resources is challenging in societies where both disadvantage women. We analyze a unique setting: northeast India, where matrilineal tribes live alongside patrilineal communities. Patriarchal cultures and political institutions are shared, but lineage norms are distinct: patrilineal groups distribute inherited wealth through men, while matrilineal tribes do so via women. We conduct survey and behavioral experiments with representative samples of both communities, alongside extensive qualitative research, and find that the gender gap reverses across patrilineal and matrilineal groups. Our results indicate that lineage norms—which determine who gets to make decisions about wealth and how—are key determinants of the political economy gender gap.

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APA

Brulé, R., & Gaikwad, N. (2021). Culture, capital, and the political economy gender gap: Evidence from meghalaya’s matrilineal tribes. Journal of Politics, 83(3), 834–850. https://doi.org/10.1086/711176

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