The barred grunt Conodon nobilis (Perciformes: Haemulidae) in shallow areas of a tropical bight: Spatial and temporal distribution, body growth and diet

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Abstract

This study aimed to comprehensively investigate the population biology of Conodon nobilis (Perciformes, Haemulidae) in Caraguatatuba Bight, southeastern Brazil. Monthly trawls were performed from October 2003 through October 2004 in two areas of the bight that are similar to but distant from each other, South and North. For all specimens, the size was measured and the sex and reproductive stage identified. Abundance and size were compared over areas and months. Body growth parameters were parameterized according to the Von Bertalanffy growth function. The stomach contents were identified and quantified. C. nobilis occurred mainly in the North area and showed an erratic pattern of abundance over time. Several cohorts entered in different periods, but very few large and mature individuals were observed. The results indicate a preference for shallow, ocean-influenced habitats and some degree of segregation between young and older individuals. The species showed a distribution consistent with an r-strategist species, with high abundance and a high growth constant (K = 0.68 year-1 and L max = 34.2 cm). Both the relative length of the digestive tube and the prey items indicated a carnivorous feeding habit; mysids were the main item of the diet throughout the study period, indicating that this grunt is a specialist feeder. Other frequently observed items were amphipods and fish fragments. Ingestion of scales is possibly intentional. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg and AWI.

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Pombo, M., Denadai, M. R., Bessa, E., Santos, F. B., de Faria, V. H., & Turra, A. (2014). The barred grunt Conodon nobilis (Perciformes: Haemulidae) in shallow areas of a tropical bight: Spatial and temporal distribution, body growth and diet. Helgoland Marine Research, 68(2), 271–279. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10152-014-0387-2

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