Typologies based on adherence to myths about intimate partner violence against women: Evidence from a latent class analysis

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Abstract

Myths about intimate partner violence against women favour abuse by functioning as elements justifying aggressions. The current research contributes to the limited research in this area by using latent class analysis (LCA) to identify typologies based on adherence to ten myths and beliefs about intimate partner violence and then examining the characteristics defining each of the classes. For this, a sample composed of 1,007 individuals (51.1% women and 48.9% men; M = 45.37 years) was used. The results reveal a pattern of three latent classes: low adhesion (n = 663; 65.8%), moderate adhesion (n = 113; 11.2%), and high adhesion (n = 231; 22.9%). The classes differed quantitatively and qualitatively and belonging to classes featuring a greater acceptance of these myths was associated with more sexist attitudes.

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APA

León, C. M., & Aizpurúa, E. (2021, April 1). Typologies based on adherence to myths about intimate partner violence against women: Evidence from a latent class analysis. Revista Internacional de Sociologia. CSIC Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas. https://doi.org/10.3989/RIS.2021.79.1.19.135

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