Blurred lines: The home front, the battlefront, and the wartime relationship between citizens and government in the Republic of Vietnam

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Abstract

In the Republic of Vietnam, the blending of the home and battle fronts shaped the relationship between citizens and their government. Civilians viewed the national government as the institution responsible for various forms of social welfare related to the war and the resulting militarisation of non-combatants’ lives. An examination of citizens’ letters to its ministries shifts the focus from questions of political legitimacy to citizens’ expectations of their government. The role of gender in family and social structures also shaped how Vietnamese civilians perceived their war experiences and their relationships to the government.

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APA

Marie Stur, H. (2019). Blurred lines: The home front, the battlefront, and the wartime relationship between citizens and government in the Republic of Vietnam. War and Society, 38(1), 57–79. https://doi.org/10.1080/07292473.2019.1524345

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