Social Entrepreneurship Business Models: Incentive Strategies to Catalyze Public Goods Provision

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Abstract

The discourse on social entrepreneurship is probably one of the most exciting issues to have emerged in social and economic research in recent years. The exclusive fixation of organizational theory on institutions and structures has given way to the dynamics of personal involvement once again. A person can make all the difference. And a value-driven culture can make all the difference. Civil society matters for the solution of social problems and the production of public goods in the twenty-first century. Social entrepreneurship has the potential to transform our understanding of the social fabric of a modern society. But to reach that point, new types of social scientific research programmes have to be developed. Fruitful research directions could possibly be inspired by the following research questions: What exactly is the role of a social entrepreneur vis-à-vis stakeholder networks in the context of modern society? What are the critical success factors of social entrepreneurial activity? Which business strategies are most promising for what types of problem or institutional environment?.

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APA

Sommerrock, K. (2010). Social Entrepreneurship Business Models: Incentive Strategies to Catalyze Public Goods Provision. Social Entrepreneurship Business Models: Incentive Strategies to Catalyze Public Goods Provision (pp. 1–307). Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230298033

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