In vitrotherapies for virus elimination of potato-valuable germplasm in Norway

0Citations
Citations of this article
7Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is one of the most important crops grown in Norway, and virus-free plants are required for commercial potato production and for preservation of potato germplasm. The present study evaluates three in vitro therapies – meristem culture, cryotherapy, and chemotherapy combined with thermotherapy – to eliminate viruses from eight historically valuable potato cultivars belonging to the Norwegian potato germplasm. Potato virus Y, potato virus M, potato virus X and potato virus S were present in eight selected old potato cultivars due to long-term conservation in open field. Double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunological assay (DAS-ELISA) and biological indicators were the standard tests used to confirm virus infection in our study. Six virus-free plants from four potato cultivars were obtained after meristem culture, and no virus-free potato cultivars were obtained after cryotherapy. Virus-free frequency for eight different potato cultivars after combining chemotherapy with thermotherapy varied from 36.4% to 100%, with single virus elimination rates of between 74.2% and 92.9%. Chemotherapy compared with thermotherapy was the most effective of the three in vitro therapies used in this study. Highly sensitive small RNA high-throughput sequencing (HTS) was used to evaluate the virus status of potato virus-free materials after virus eradication, and no virus was found, which was consistent with the results of DAS-ELISA and biological indicators. Small RNA HTS has been reported for the first time to evaluate the virus status after virus elimination and to control virus-free potato nuclear stocks.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Zhang, Z., Wang, Q. C., Spetz, C., & Blystad, D. R. (2019). In vitrotherapies for virus elimination of potato-valuable germplasm in Norway. Scientia Horticulturae, 249, 7–14. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scienta.2019.01.027

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free