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Remarks on Education: Illustrating the Close Connection Between Virtue and Wisdom: To which is Annexed, a System of Liberal Education

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Abstract

Samuel Harrison Smith (1772–1845) was born to a Philadelphia merchant family and educated in Philadelphia schools, earning a BA (1787) and MA (1790) from the University of Pennsylvania. Ambitious and financially secure, Smith launched a printing business at the age of 19, which included the American Universal Magazine, the New World, and the Independent Gazetteer, which he renamed the Universal Gazette. In recognition of his accomplishments in publishing, the APS elected Smith to membership in 1797 before the announcement of his victory in the essay contest. After the contest, Smith donated his prize winnings to the APS to fund a second contest and became an active member in the organization. In 1800, Smith married his cousin, Margaret Bayard, and moved to Washington, DC at the invitation of Thomas Jefferson to found what would become the mouthpiece of Jefferson’s Democratic-Republican Party: the triweekly National Intelligencer and Washington Advisor.1

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APA

Smith, S. H. (2013). Remarks on Education: Illustrating the Close Connection Between Virtue and Wisdom: To which is Annexed, a System of Liberal Education. In The Founding Fathers, Education, and “The Great Contest” (pp. 205–217). Palgrave Macmillan US. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137271020_12

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