Effects of Virtual Reality vs Conventional Balance Training on Balance and Falls in People With Multiple Sclerosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

0Citations
Citations of this article
37Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

Objective: To assess the efficacy of virtual reality (VR)-based vs conventional balance training on the improvement of balance and reduction of falls in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Design: Single-blinded, randomized, controlled trial. Setting: Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences. Participants: PwMS (N=39), randomized into VR (n=19) and control (n=20) groups. Intervention: The VR group performed exergames using Kinect, while the control group accomplished conventional balance exercises. Both groups received 18 training sessions for 6 weeks. Main Outcome Measures: Limits of stability, timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and 10-m walk tests with and without cognitive task and their dual-task costs (DTCs), Berg Balance Scale, Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12, Fall Efficacy Scale-International, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, and fall history were obtained pre- and post intervention and after a 3-month follow-up. Results: At both post intervention and follow-up, TUGcognitive and DTCs on the TUG were significantly lower and the 10-m walkcognitive was significantly higher in the VR group. At follow-up, reaction time and the number of falls demonstrated significant differences favoring the VR group, whereas the directional control revealed significant difference in favor of the control group (P

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Molhemi, F., Monjezi, S., Mehravar, M., Shaterzadeh-Yazdi, M. J., Salehi, R., Hesam, S., & Mohammadianinejad, E. (2021). Effects of Virtual Reality vs Conventional Balance Training on Balance and Falls in People With Multiple Sclerosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 102(2), 290–299. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2020.09.395

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free