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How involuntary subordination and social support influence the association between self-esteem and depression: A moderated mediation model

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Abstract

Background: In China, young migrants are at elevated risk of mental health problems, such as depression. The influence of self-esteem on depression is well acknowledged. We examined correlates of depression and their mediating and moderating role in the association between self-esteem and depression to promote a better understanding of depression prevention among young migrants. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among young Chinese migrants. A moderated mediation model was used to test the combined effect of involuntary subordination and social support on the association between self-esteem and depression. The Johnson-Neyman method was used to identify the range of scores for which social support acted as a moderator. Results: A total of 572 participants completed questionnaires. The median depression score was 19 (interquartile range: 14). Self-esteem had a negative effect on involuntary subordination (β = - 2.1440, p < 0.001). Involuntary subordination (β = 0.2406, p < 0.001), self-esteem (β = - 0.3870, p < 0.01), and social support (β = - 0.1221, p < 0.01) all had significant effects on depression. The effect of involuntary subordination on depression was moderated by social support (β = - 0.0041, p < 0.05), and the effect decreased as social support scores increased. Conclusions: Our results indicated a mediating role of involuntary subordination and a moderating role of social support in the association between self-esteem and depression among young Chinese migrants. Future intervention strategies should focus on these factors to reduce depressive symptoms.

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APA

Shen, Q., Shi, Y., Zhang, S., Tsamlag, L., Wang, H., Chang, R., … Cai, Y. (2019). How involuntary subordination and social support influence the association between self-esteem and depression: A moderated mediation model. BMC Psychiatry, 19(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-019-2330-1

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