Skip to main content

The Mixed Blessings of Material Progress: Diminishing Returns in the Pursuit of Happiness

  • Eckersley R
N/ACitations
Citations of this article
4Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

This reprinted article originally appeared in Journal of Happiness Studies, 2000, Vol 1 (3), 267-292. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record [rid]2005-05234-002[/rid].) The progress of nations is widely believed to enhance the happiness of their people. However, whether progress, as currently defined and derived, is increasing happiness and well-being in rich nations is problematic. The paper explores the relationship between economic growth and human development and the use of subjective measures of both life satisfaction and social quality of life as indicators of progress, noting the complex nature of well-being and the differences between personal and social perspectives. It questions whether widely used, simple measures are adequate, and whether greater happiness should, in any case, be regarded as the ultimate goal of progress. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Eckersley, R. (2013). The Mixed Blessings of Material Progress: Diminishing Returns in the Pursuit of Happiness (pp. 227–246). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-5702-8_12

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free