Office-based breast ductoscopy for diagnosis

25Citations
Citations of this article
6Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Ductoscopy is an evolving technology that has been used primarily and historically in conjunction with open surgical procedures. New technical improvements allow intraductal biopsy and therefore its application in the clinical setting for diagnostic evaluations of the breast. This study looks at the initial use of intraductal biopsy in a variety of settings from an academic university practice to a private single-surgeon office. This is a multicenter retrospective series of 88 patients undergoing ductoscopy of ≥1 duct for the diagnostic workup of common breast problems. The procedures were done with the patient under local anesthesia, and intraductal biopsy specimens were taken and analyzed as breast cytology samples. Of the 88 patients undergoing office ductoscopy, nipple discharge was the most common indication (n = 83 patients; 94% to 66% spontaneous and 34% elicited). Fifty-five percent were high risk for breast cancer by history. The majority of patients had normal previous mammograms: 48 Breast ImagingReporting and Data System (BIRADS) 1, 24 BIRADS 2, and 7 BIRADS 3 to 5. The most common finding was papilloma present in 29 (32%) patients by endoscopy. Only 31% of patients had a history of brown or bloody nipple discharge. A wide variety of other endoscopic abnormalities were seen and biopsied. The average number of biopsies per patient was 2 with 18 (20.5%) having severe or malignant atypia. Further follow-up and management of these more concerning abnormalities is currently ongoing. These results indicate that office ductoscopy with biopsy is both feasible and does identify suspicious or malignant atypia in patients with expressed or spontaneous nipple fluid. © 2004 Excerpta Medica Inc. All rights reserved.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Dooley, W. C., Francescatti, D., Clark, L., & Webber, G. (2004). Office-based breast ductoscopy for diagnosis. American Journal of Surgery, 188(4 SPEC. ISS.), 415–418. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2004.06.035

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free