Abortive or minimal-growth hemangiomas: Immunohistochemical evidence that they represent true infantile hemangiomas

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Abstract

Background: Infantile hemangiomas have a characteristic natural history of rapid proliferation in the first weeks of life followed by spontaneous involution. At birth, they may be present as a precursor lesion. Sometimes one may see precursor lesions that never undergo a growth phase or that undergo minimal growth. It is unclear the exact nature of these precursor-like lesions. Objective: We sought to describe the morphology and histopathology of these precursor-like lesions. Methods: We describe 4 patients with macules resembling precursor lesions of hemangiomas that did not show proliferation phase or minimal growth. The histopathologic and immunohistochemical study with glucose transporter-1 was performed in all of these cases. Results: The skin biopsy specimen showed superficial ectatic vessels that reacted with anti-glucose transporter-1 antibodies. All skin biopsy specimens exhibited capillary lobules in papillary dermis and, in two of them, in the reticular dermis and subcutis. Limitations: This text is limited by the number of cases reported. Conclusions: Precursor lesions of hemangioma that do not show proliferation phase or minimal growth represent, in the view of glucose transporter-1 immunoreactivity, true hemangiomas of infancy with an aborted or arrested growth cycle. © 2008 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc.

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APA

Corella, F., Garcia-Navarro, X., Ribe, A., Alomar, A., & Baselga, E. (2008). Abortive or minimal-growth hemangiomas: Immunohistochemical evidence that they represent true infantile hemangiomas. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 58(4), 685–690. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2007.08.007

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