Alzheimer's pathology in primary progressive aphasia

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Abstract

Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a neurodegenerative disorder with language impairment as the primary feature. Different subtypes have been described and the 3 best characterized are progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA), semantic dementia (SD) and logopenic/phonological aphasia (LPA). Of these subtypes, LPA is most commonly associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. However, the features of PPA associated with AD have not been fully defined. Here we retrospectively identified 14 patients with PPA and either pathologically confirmed AD or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers consistent with AD. Analysis of neurological and neuropsychological features revealed that all patients had a syndrome of LPA with relatively nonfluent spontaneous speech, phonemic errors, and reduced digit span; most patients also had impaired verbal episodic memory. Analysis of the pattern of cortical thinning in these patients revealed left posterior superior temporal, inferior parietal, medial temporal, and posterior cingulate involvement and in patients with more severe disease, increasing involvement of left anterior temporal and frontal cortices and right hemisphere areas in the temporo-parietal junction, posterior cingulate, and medial temporal lobe. We propose that LPA may be a "unihemispheric" presentation of AD, and discuss this concept in relation to accumulating evidence concerning language dysfunction in AD. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

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Rohrer, J. D., Rossor, M. N., & Warren, J. D. (2012). Alzheimer’s pathology in primary progressive aphasia. Neurobiology of Aging, 33(4), 744–752. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2010.05.020

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