Adaptation of faba bean varieties for yield, for yield components and against faba bean gall (Olpidium viciae Kusano) disease in South Gondar, Ethiopia

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Abstract

Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) has an important place in the Ethiopian national diet. It is consumed in various forms and contributes to the improvement of soil fertility. However, its production and productivity are affected by biotic and abiotic constraints. Among the biotic constraints, the emerging faba bean gall disease, caused by Olpidium viciae, is the major and most destructive disease wherever faba bean is grown. Field experiments were conducted at two locations (Farta and Tach Gayint districts) to evaluate the reaction of faba bean varieties to faba bean gall disease and to assess them for yield and yield components during the 2014 and 2015 main cropping seasons. Thirteen faba bean varieties and one local check were planted in three replications using a randomized complete block design. The disease incidence and severity of faba bean gall were recorded (on a 1–9 scale) five times at 10-day intervals. A combined analysis of variance showed a significant difference (P < 0.05) among faba bean varieties with respect to the incidence and severity of gall disease at both locations. Disease incidence, severity, and AUDPC were lowest for variety Tumsa at both locations, but this variety showed high yield only at the Farta location. The highest yields were obtained from varieties Degaga (1157.74 kg ha− 1) and Nc58 (828.97 kg ha− 1) at Farta and Tach Gayint, respectively and these varieties showed low faba bean gall severity and AUDPC. Thus, higher-yielding faba bean varieties such as Degaga and Nc58 are recommended for faba bean production areas in northwestern Ethiopia.

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APA

Yitayih, G., & Azmeraw, Y. (2017). Adaptation of faba bean varieties for yield, for yield components and against faba bean gall (Olpidium viciae Kusano) disease in South Gondar, Ethiopia. Crop Journal, 5(6), 560–566. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cj.2017.05.007

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