Adaptive center-surround interactions in human vision revealed during binocular rivalry

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Abstract

We used binocular rivalry as a psychophysical probe to explore center-surround interactions in orientation, motion and color processing. Addition of the surround matching one of the rival targets dramatically altered rivalry dynamics. For all visual sub-modalities tested, predominance of the high-contrast rival target matched to the surround was greatly reduced-a result that disappeared at low contrast. At low contrast, addition of the surround boosted dominance of orientation and motion targets matched to the surround. This contrast-dependent modulation of center-surround interactions seems to be a general property of the visual system and may reflect an adaptive balance between surround suppression and spatial summation. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Paffen, C. L. E., Tadin, D., Te Pas, S. F., Blake, R., & Verstraten, F. A. J. (2006). Adaptive center-surround interactions in human vision revealed during binocular rivalry. Vision Research, 46(5), 599–604. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2005.05.013

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