Associations of mortality with long-term exposures to fine and ultrafine particles, species and sources: Results from the California teachers study Cohort

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Abstract

Background: Although several cohort studies report associations between chronic exposure to fine particles (PM<inf>2.5</inf>) and mortality, few have studied the effects of chronic exposure to ultrafine (UF) particles. In addition, few studies have estimated the effects of the constituents of either PM<inf>2.5</inf> or UF particles. Methods: We used a statewide cohort of > 100,000 women from the California Teachers Study who were followed from 2001 through 2007. Exposure data at the residential level were provided by a chemical transport model that computed pollutant concentrations from > 900 sources in California. Besides particle mass, monthly concentrations of 11 species and 8 sources or primary particles were generated at 4-km grids. We used a Cox proportional hazards model to estimate the association between the pollutants and all-cause, cardiovascular, ischemic heart disease (IHD), and respiratory mortality. results: We observed statistically significant (p < 0.05) associations of IHD with PM<inf>2.5</inf> mass, nitrate, elemental carbon (EC), copper (Cu), and secondary organics and the sources gas- and diesel-fueled vehicles, meat cooking, and high-sulfur fuel combustion. The hazard ratio estimate of 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31) for IHD in association with a 10-μg/m<sup>3</sup> increase in PM<inf>2.5</inf> is consistent with findings from the American Cancer Society cohort. We also observed significant positive associations between IHD and several UF components including EC, Cu, metals, and mobile sources. conclusions: Using an emissions-based model with a 4-km spatial scale, we observed significant positive associations between IHD mortality and both fine and ultrafine particle species and sources. Our results suggest that the exposure model effectively measured local exposures and facilitated the examination of the relative toxicity of particle species.

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Ostro, B., Hu, J., Goldberg, D., Reynolds, P., Hertz, A., Bernstein, L., & Kleeman, M. J. (2015). Associations of mortality with long-term exposures to fine and ultrafine particles, species and sources: Results from the California teachers study Cohort. Environmental Health Perspectives, 123(6), 549–556. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408565

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