Differential predictors of medication adherence in HIV: Findings from a sample of African American and caucasian HIV-positive drug-using adults

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Abstract

Modest or even occasional nonadherence to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) can result in adverse clinical outcomes. African Americans demonstrate lower rates of adherence than Caucasians or Latinos. Identifying factors that influence medication adherence among African Americans is a critical step toward reducing HIV/AIDS disease progression and mortality. In a sample of 181 African American (n=144) and Caucasian (n=37) HIV-positive drug-using individuals [age (M=42.31; SD=6.6) education (M=13.41; SD=2.1)], we examined the influence of baseline drug use, literacy, neurocognition, depression, treatment-specific social support, and patient satisfaction with health care provider on medication adherence averaged over the course of 6 months (study dates 2002-2006). Our findings suggest differential baseline predictors of medication adherence for African Americans and Caucasians, such that patient satisfaction with provider was the strongest predictor of follow-up medication adherence for African Americans whereas for Caucasians depressive symptoms and treatment-specific social support were predictive of medication adherence (after controlling for duration of drug use). © 2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

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APA

Thames, A. D., Moizel, J., Panos, S. E., Patel, S. M., Byrd, D. A., Myers, H. F., … Hinkin, C. H. (2012). Differential predictors of medication adherence in HIV: Findings from a sample of African American and caucasian HIV-positive drug-using adults. AIDS Patient Care and STDs, 26(10), 621–630. https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2012.0157

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