Aged Human Skin is More Susceptible than Young Skin to Accumulate Advanced Glycoxidation Products Induced by Sun Exposure

  • Bastien P P
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Abstract

Background: Skin aging is the result of intrinsic and extrinsic phenomena. Among the factors involved in skin aging, the glycation reaction and the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) is an important element. AGEs such as carboxy-methyl-lysine (CML) and pentosidine, are formed by an oxidative process, and often referred to as glycoxidation products. AGEs have been reported to accumulate during chronological aging but sun exposure has also been shown to contribute to this accumulation likely through induction of an oxidative environment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accumulation of AGEs in human skin and, more specifically, CML and pentosidine, both of which are generated by oxidative pathways. Methods: CML and pentosidine immunolabelling were investigated in skin samples from both non photoexposed (sun protected) and photo-exposed (sun exposed) sites from donors of two different age groups (18-25 years and 70-75 years). Results: Results demonstrate CML and pentosidine accumulation in sun-exposed skin especially in the aged group. A vicious circle is envisioned in which the presence of AGEs in a tissue accelerates the formation of additional glycoxidation products following UV-exposure. Conclusion: The damaging effects of UV radiation might be more detrimental in aged skin than in young skin due, in part, to an increased accumulation of AGEs and, in turn, the exacerbation of alterations caused by chronological aging.

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Bastien P, P. H. (2013). Aged Human Skin is More Susceptible than Young Skin to Accumulate Advanced Glycoxidation Products Induced by Sun Exposure. Journal of Aging Science, 01(03). https://doi.org/10.4172/2329-8847.1000112

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