Airway wall area derived from 3-dimensional computed tomography analysis differs among lung lobes in male smokers

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Abstract

Background: It is time-consuming to obtain the square root of airway wall area of the hypothetical airway with an internal perimeter of 10 mm (√Aaw at Pi10), a comparable index of airway dimensions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), from all airways of the whole lungs using 3-dimensional computed tomography (CT) analysis. We hypothesized that √Aaw at Pi10 differs among the five lung lobes and √Aaw at Pi10 derived from one certain lung lobe has a high level of agreement with that derived from the whole lungs in smokers. Methods: Pulmonary function tests and chest volumetric CTs were performed in 157 male smokers (102 COPD, 55 non-COPD). All visible bronchial segments from the 3rdto 5thgenerations were segmented and measured using commercially available 3-dimensional CT analysis software. √Aaw at Pi10 of each lung lobe was estimated from all measurable bronchial segments of that lobe. Results: Using a mixed-effects model, √Aaw at Pi10 differed significantly among the five lung lobes (R2= 0.78, P<0.0001). The Bland-Altman plots show that √Aaw at Pi10 derived from the right or left upper lobe had a high level of agreement with that derived from the whole lungs, while √Aaw at Pi10 derived from the right or left lower lobe did not. Conclusion: In male smokers, CT-derived airway wall area differs among the five lung lobes, and airway wall area derived from the right or left upper lobe is representative of the whole lungs. © 2014 Tho et al.

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Van Tho, N., Trang, L. T. H., Murakami, Y., Ogawa, E., Ryujin, Y., Kanda, R., … Nakano, Y. (2014). Airway wall area derived from 3-dimensional computed tomography analysis differs among lung lobes in male smokers. PLoS ONE, 9(5). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0098335

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